Jumping out of the way to prevent being tagged

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Aug 1, 2019
901
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MN
Also a teachable moment, what did your pitcher, shortstop, and maybe even your 1st baseman and left fielder do? Were they spectators or were they hustling for backup positions in a potential rundown?
 
Mar 5, 2023
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A lot of good advice on this. We had this situation twice last year. Two different umps, two different calls, so that was fun. lol.

I would like to piggy back off this.

What if the catcher would've tagged her (inside the base path) but dropped the ball, then the runner goes out of the 3 foot base path? Is she still out for going more than 3 feet outside the base path? Would a new base path be established from where the tag was applied?

Also, what if she goes out of the base path before the tag, then gets tagged and catcher drops the ball? I'm assuming on this one she is out automatically for leaving the 3+/- feet, so the tag is void.
 
May 27, 2022
412
63
A lot of good advice on this. We had this situation twice last year. Two different umps, two different calls, so that was fun. lol.

I would like to piggy back off this.

What if the catcher would've tagged her (inside the base path) but dropped the ball, then the runner goes out of the 3 foot base path? Is she still out for going more than 3 feet outside the base path? Would a new base path be established from where the tag was applied?

Also, what if she goes out of the base path before the tag, then gets tagged and catcher drops the ball? I'm assuming on this one she is out automatically for leaving the 3+/- feet, so the tag is void.

Holy splitting-hairs Batman!

Yes, if you leave the path trying to avoid the tag, you are out. Doesn't matter if it is before or after the actual tag.
 
Feb 13, 2021
880
93
MI
What if the catcher would've tagged her (inside the base path) but dropped the ball, then the runner goes out of the 3 foot base path? Is she still out for going more than 3 feet outside the base path? Would a new base path be established from where the tag was applied?
This is the interesting part of the scenario. Runner is in proper base path, C goes to apply tag while runner is still in proper base path, C drops ball, (she is now, possibly, in the base path without possession of the ball?), runner leaves base path (to avoid the C who is illegally obstructing the runner, since the C does not have possession of the ball). Hrmmm, an argument can be made for obstruction on the C, runner will be awarded the base she would have reached absent the obstruction (home in this case). Hard to make a ruling without seeing an actual play, who was where and at what time was the ball dropped.

Love "stump the ump" scenarios.
 
Mar 5, 2023
6
3
This is the interesting part of the scenario. Runner is in proper base path, C goes to apply tag while runner is still in proper base path, C drops ball, (she is now, possibly, in the base path without possession of the ball?), runner leaves base path (to avoid the C who is illegally obstructing the runner, since the C does not have possession of the ball). Hrmmm, an argument can be made for obstruction on the C, runner will be awarded the base she would have reached absent the obstruction (home in this case). Hard to make a ruling without seeing an actual play, who was where and at what time was the ball dropped.

Love "stump the ump" scenarios.

Lol, yes it's a confusing but interesting scenario. I didn't think about obstruction, that's a valid point.

One thing I was thinking about was the base path. If the base path is created when there is a play on the runner, C drops the ball. Does that create a new base path for the runner? Or like you said, obstruction by the catcher. Wild scenario. We had several of the base path calls last season, and it's so subjective with the three feet.
 
May 29, 2015
3,665
113
The runner's base path is a straight line from the player to the base they are going to. This really only matters (1) when a tag is being attempted and (2) when a defensive player is in the base path illegally.

If the catcher drops the ball and is in the base path without the ball then yes, it is obstruction. No different than the fielder who throws a ball during a run down. There is no exception to being in the base path without the ball. (OK, maybe one exception: a fielder fielding a batted ball.)

3 feet is a very finite and objective measurement. However, ask 30 people to show you three feet without any measuring or definitive point of reference and you will get 30 different examples.
 
Last edited:
Aug 1, 2019
901
93
MN
The runner's base path is a straight line from the player to the base they are going to. This really only matters (1) when a tag is being attempted and (2) when a defensive player is in the base path illegally.

If the catcher drops the ball and is in the base path without the ball then yes, it is obstruction. No different than the fielder who throws a ball during a run down. There is no exception to being in the base path without the ball. (OK, maybe one exception: a fielder fielding a batted ball.)

3 feet is a very finite and objective measurement. However, ask 30 people to show you three feet without any measuring or definitive point of reference and you will get 30 different examples.
What sticks with me is how some people would measure yards of fabric or rope. Both hands holding the material at the sternum, one arm extends fully out to the side while the material slides through the other hand staying at the sternum; 3 ft. Repeat as necessary.
So to me if the defender extends an arm out fully to tag and they still miss the runner, that's a good indicator the runner might be beyond 3 ft.
 
May 29, 2015
3,665
113
360_F_2932530_ist34EOgqVoydmRF235jt3DNfpUI6k.jpg
 

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