How exactly does committing/signing work

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Jun 8, 2016
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We could debate the origins, but I'm not sure how that matters.
If you didn't continually ignore my point you would see it does matter. Lets do this another way. Hopefully we can agree that IQ tests
measure, among other things, ones ability to process information. With that said:

Do you agree that some people are able to process information faster than other people? Yes or No (if no, then you are basically saying everybody has the same IQ...)

If yes, do you think that would be advantageous in a timed test situation assuming two people have the exact same knowledge of, and experience with, the subject matter? Yes or No.

Knowledge/experience and problem solving speed are obviously connected, nobody is saying otherwise. Problem solving ability in a given area is a combination of knowledge, experience and innate intelligence. If you want to believe the latter has nothing to do with it then maybe you haven't been around enough ridiculously smart people.

Further, many professional boards/exams typically only require a passing score so as long as you know the subject matter there is some leniency.

Finally, again, the phrase "doesn't test well" IS RELATIVE to how they perform in other measures of knowledge...

I am not sure why you are choosing to die on this hill. Is there something about that phrase that inherently bothers you? It is ok, you can call us Karens if you think that is what it is...
 
Last edited:
Sep 3, 2015
372
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FWIW, I don’t know what a 104 weighted GPA is, but my DD graduated 4th in her class with a 4.5 cumulative. I think she scored an 1160 on her SATs which was not considered a great score.

So there was no need to send in the SAT, but she did still get academic money.


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LEsoftballdad

DFP Vendor
Jun 29, 2021
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NY
FWIW, I don’t know what a 104 weighted GPA is, but my DD graduated 4th in her class with a 4.5 cumulative. I think she scored an 1160 on her SATs which was not considered a great score.

So there was no need to send in the SAT, but she did still get academic money.


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It's similar to what you mentioned but out of 100 instead of a 4.0 scale. An AP/IB class is usually weighted between 1.07 and 1.1, while an honors course is weighted at 1.03-1.05. You multiply your standard grade in the class by the weighting to give you a weighted average.
 
May 27, 2013
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I believe my point is pretty clear, but I'm a bit confused about yours. A 1300 is a really good score...90th+ percentile.

Some apparently do spend lots of money on prep, but it's not necessary if the kid is a good or even a decent student. The vast majority of the time, it's about getting comfortable with the format and time constraints. A bit of "game speed" practice works wonders, as does taking the test more than once. Yeah, not everyone gets a top 10% score, but with the right focus of effort, it will probably be north of 1000.

It's an unpopular opinion for some, but the "doesn't test well" is a cop-out, and I suspect YOU wouldn't be very sympathetic to that argument in one of your ME classes. Given the types of exams my kids have dealt with in college, they'd tell you the ACT/SAT was comparatively easy.
I was a good student, definitely above average in HS, and could not get a great score on the SAT with good prep. I honestly felt that the board exams I took for my profession were much easier than the SAT. I also do believe that bias comes into play.
 
May 27, 2013
2,289
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We also have to remember that a “great score” is relative to the schools one is looking at. A 1500 would probably not be considered a great score for MIT, and would be considered below average for Harvard and some of the other Ivies.
 
May 27, 2013
2,289
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Wow, that sure did shatter the theory! So you achieved an average score on the SAT that you took in HS. At what point did I ever claim that an average score, or any particular score, was a barrier to later success? Through your 6-7 years as a college student, did you enter every exam with a "I don't test well" mantra rattling through your head? My guess is no.

The barrier to success is a belief, often coming from parents, that a student can't effectively take a test...ANY test...measuring what they've supposedly already learned.

It's such a strange position to take as the parent of a kid who plays competitive sports.
No, I actually never entered any exam with the thought that “I don‘t test well.“ My SAT score actually shocked me, and shocked me again after going through a prep class and still scoring the same (granted it was a prep run by my HS - not one that involved a private tutor). You came across as insinuating that if one couldn’t do well on the SAT then they would struggle with any STEM/professional exams. It’s just not the case.

I knew what I needed to put into studying in order to do well on tests in HS and college. I knew what I needed to do to pass my board exams. I thought I knew how to prepare for the SAT but obviously it was one exam I could not do well on.

I also have never stated that MY kids don’t test well. They both actually did extremely well on their SAT/ACT tests.
 
Apr 28, 2014
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I'll add a bit as it seems there may be some confusion. This is for D1 and what we experienced. Once the schools reach out on 9/1 and mutual interest is there the player will be invited for an official visit. Prior to the visits all 3 schools we went to asked for HS transcripts and SAT scores. When we arrived part of the visit was sitting down to discuss the offer. In DD's case all 3 took the total cost and first subtracted what her "projected academic awards" would be. They based this on the players current grades and SAT scores if they have taken them. They, then subtract that academic award projection from the total cost of the year "all in" including room, food, books etc. That difference was the offer in athletic money. When you hear the term "full ride" that is what most who claim to get a full ride receive.
Yes, no out of pocket if that's the offer but some or most of it will come from academic money and here is the kicker. The award totals you are given are estimates. The player MUST quality for a stacking offer if they are to combine athletic and academic money.
This is where it can get confusing... the NCAA has established that in order to stack, the player must have a 1200 SAT or 3.5 non-weighted GPA. This is to prevent schools who run out of athletic money from using academic money to pad their rosters. Now do all schools follow this? I'm not sure but suspect that they do. And yes a 3.5 should be an easy GPA but many kids take AP and Honors classes and get an occasional B which can hurt their weighed GPA vs kids who take the easy road in HS. And some are not at 1200 SAT. We didn't have those issues, but we know of situations where players didn't meet the minimum. Keep the grades up!

NCAA requirements to combine academic and athletic scholarships
  • Top 10 percent of high school graduating class.
  • 3.5 cumulative GPA out of 4.0.
  • 1200 SAT score/105 ACT sum score.

Once DD committed to the school that she chose she was then asked for fill out an application and submit her official transcripts, this was in her senior year in September as NLI signing day is in November and she will need to have been accepted to the school prior to getting her official offer on paper. Once NLI signing date comes your DD will get her final and official offer that will list just her athletic money. When she gets her student account set up in the summer you will then see all of her awards and balance if any is owed. All done. And the usuals apply, in that she must maintain a certain GPA to retain academic awards and her athletic awards could vary based on performance.
 
Sep 3, 2015
372
63
I'll add a bit as it seems there may be some confusion. This is for D1 and what we experienced. Once the schools reach out on 9/1 and mutual interest is there the player will be invited for an official visit. Prior to the visits all 3 schools we went to asked for HS transcripts and SAT scores. When we arrived part of the visit was sitting down to discuss the offer. In DD's case all 3 took the total cost and first subtracted what her "projected academic awards" would be. They based this on the players current grades and SAT scores if they have taken them. They, then subtract that academic award projection from the total cost of the year "all in" including room, food, books etc. That difference was the offer in athletic money. When you hear the term "full ride" that is what most who claim to get a full ride receive.
Yes, no out of pocket if that's the offer but some or most of it will come from academic money and here is the kicker. The award totals you are given are estimates. The player MUST quality for a stacking offer if they are to combine athletic and academic money.
This is where it can get confusing... the NCAA has established that in order to stack, the player must have a 1200 SAT or 3.5 non-weighted GPA. This is to prevent schools who run out of athletic money from using academic money to pad their rosters. Now do all schools follow this? I'm not sure but suspect that they do. And yes a 3.5 should be an easy GPA but many kids take AP and Honors classes and get an occasional B which can hurt their weighed GPA vs kids who take the easy road in HS. And some are not at 1200 SAT. We didn't have those issues, but we know of situations where players didn't meet the minimum. Keep the grades up!

NCAA requirements to combine academic and athletic scholarships
  • Top 10 percent of high school graduating class.
  • 3.5 cumulative GPA out of 4.0.
  • 1200 SAT score/105 ACT sum score.

Once DD committed to the school that she chose she was then asked for fill out an application and submit her official transcripts, this was in her senior year in September as NLI signing day is in November and she will need to have been accepted to the school prior to getting her official offer on paper. Once NLI signing date comes your DD will get her final and official offer that will list just her athletic money. When she gets her student account set up in the summer you will then see all of her awards and balance if any is owed. All done. And the usuals apply, in that she must maintain a certain GPA to retain academic awards and her athletic awards could vary based on performance.

The part about the required SAT score was not true in my DDs case. She never submitted them to the school.


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Sep 3, 2015
372
63
Nobody has mentioned the COA (Cost of Attendance) or the fact that the NCAA allows 110% of cost as maximum. 10% can be hit or miss at different programs.

If this is in play, 10% of the total cost goes back to the student (per quarter/semester) for things such as toothpaste, etc.

The students are also allowed to modify their meal plan, and the difference will go back to them, modifiable per semester/quarter.


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