Do Players Accept Criticism?

Welcome to Discuss Fastpitch

Your FREE Account is waiting to the Best Softball Community on the Web.

Nov 30, 2018
27
3
I've been planning more videos around this topic, but I'm curious if parents feel the same way I do, which is that each younger generation of players is less capable of accepting and responding well to constructive criticism or firm coaching.

Thoughts? This video outlined my thoughts.

 
Jun 8, 2016
9,307
113
My thought is that I doubt it is an evolutionary thing nor too many chemicals in the environment so if it is true then we all know where most of the blame needs to be placed…🤷🏽‍♂️
 
May 29, 2015
2,375
113
I like most of the message and I love the concept, Coach! We definitely need more game education on the mental and emotional aspects of the game!

I could be wrong, but in a few places it felt like you were excusing (or downplaying) coaches who overreact though. You talk about the player not being emotional when taking criticism, but then excuse the coach's emotional response.

Maybe you have one out there, but I think you could do a great a video for coaches on HOW to offer criticism (keying in on that destructive/constructive spectrum and recognizing how different players react).

My bias is going to show ... how about one on how to interact with umpires or a bad call? ;)
 
Jun 11, 2013
2,332
83
The way I see it, the kids today will take constructive criticism but only if that's what it is. If you berate them and yell they'll just tune you out. To me the biggest change in the last 30-40 years is that these kids just don't automatically respect a title. If you are an idiot they don't care if you are their manager or boss,etc. They want to know why they are doing things and aren't afraid to ask if another way is better.
 
Jun 6, 2016
1,554
113
Chicago
The way I see it, the kids today will take constructive criticism but only if that's what it is. If you berate them and yell they'll just tune you out. To me the biggest change in the last 30-40 years is that these kids just don't automatically respect a title. If you are an idiot they don't care if you are their manager or boss,etc. They want to know why they are doing things and aren't afraid to ask if another way is better.

Agree with all this. And I consider it a good thing (and it bodes well for the future).

If a coach thinks a kid should listen to everything they say *just because*, I think you're looking at a bad coach. Or at least a bad teacher. Earn their respect. Prove to them why they should listen to you. It's absolutely not always easy, but you're a mentor and a coach and a leader, not a dictator.

It's funny how a generation of boss-hating adults now gets upset when a younger generation is willing to question why someone is even the boss in the first place.
 
Jun 11, 2013
2,332
83
Agree with all this. And I consider it a good thing (and it bodes well for the future).

If a coach thinks a kid should listen to everything they say *just because*, I think you're looking at a bad coach. Or at least a bad teacher. Earn their respect. Prove to them why they should listen to you. It's absolutely not always easy, but you're a mentor and a coach and a leader, not a dictator.

It's funny how a generation of boss-hating adults now gets upset when a younger generation is willing to question why someone is even the boss in the first place.
I guess I wasn't clear, but I also think it's a good thing.
 
Mar 4, 2015
319
43
New England
Is it a moot question? I mean, if kids have changed, then what? You still have to meet them where they are, regardless, so I don't know that it matters if kids are less accepting of constructive criticism or 'firm' coaching.

Your video is good. Players must learn to be more coachable and to deal with various coaching styles to reach their potential.

Also liked the points that Man in Blue made about coaches, because it's a two-way street. Coaches have to be flexible, also. If what is intended as constructive criticism isn't helpful, then it isn't constructive. And similarly, 'firm' or 'soft' coaching is neither good nor bad by itself. Question is, is it working on this particular player or team? You can try to teach players to be more coachable, but might also adjust coaching style to fit. Anything to help. But it's not all on the player.

And I wouldn't generalize about coaches only trying to help players get better. Coaches have all sorts of motivations for being 'firm' in their coaching methods, not all of them good. There are coaches who are using their players to meet their own competitive needs who aren't really concerned about a player improving except in how it can help the coach. Some are just venting their frustrations and calling that coaching. So you can't just tell a player to trust that their coach is only trying to make you better. Coaches have to prove it over time. They have to earn that trust. Once players trust that you genuinely care about them, they'll tolerate more firmness.
 

marriard

Not lost - just no idea where I am
Oct 2, 2011
3,963
113
Florida
I have coached for 30+ years and as I got better as a coach, it is is amazing that it has become easier and easier to provide constructive criticism and to have it accepted by players. There are LOTS of resources out there to become a better coach - too bad most of these coaches don't take it on themselves to use them.

I honestly don't see much difference in the kids themselves.

When it comes down to it - as a coach I am a GROWN adult with supposedly more life experience, wisdom and knowledge than the youth sports players I am coaching. It should be more on the coach than the player.
 

Products discussed on DFP

Forum statistics

Threads
39,189
Messages
602,935
Members
18,681
Latest member
wvsteve
Top