Another rant

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Aug 21, 2008
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Ok but that isn’t typically how “seamers” are defined..at least as how I understand it.
agreed, I was only trying to assume what he must've meant. Just simply by the way the softball is made, throwing something that spins with 1 seam would be impossible. So, I was only guessing what he must've meant. Who knows, maybe their pitching coach has revolutionized pitching and developed a brand new pitch? That would be the only other explanation.
 
Nov 22, 2019
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I've near heard of a 1 seamer. I assume he means finger pressure on one seam of the ball. NJswamp, how old is your kid? Is she really ready to be working on cut pitches and such? I'll defer to your pitching coach who may know more than anyone, certainly more than me since I've never met you guys but, it just doesn't seem that long ago your were posting videos of a very very very young, developing pitcher. And in less than a year she's learning to cut the ball in and out? I'm not challenging you or your coach, I'm just asking. Because that seems like a VERY fast development.
Yes, she’s still a young developing pitcher. Yes, the other finger is more next to the seam or slightly touching it. She’s 11, just started 12-u this fall. It’s more experimentation, but it’s been working so it’s being called in games.

When practicing, 95%+ of the time she’s working on fixing her mechanical issues or working on her change-up. My guess is that in a few years the change-up is her best pitch, because she can spin it and drop it off a shelf.

 
Aug 24, 2021
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Yes, she’s still a young developing pitcher. Yes, the other finger is more next to the seam or slightly touching it. She’s 11, just started 12-u this fall. It’s more experimentation, but it’s been working so it’s being called in games.

When practicing, 95%+ of the time she’s working on fixing her mechanical issues or working on her change-up. My guess is that in a few years the change-up is her best pitch, because she can spin it and drop it off a shelf.

Looks like her arm slows down on the changeup. Dead give away to older batters, a ton of girls do this. Just was watching a Beverly Bandits 13U team play 10 minutes ago, and even their pitcher, who was throwing very well, fell into the trap of slowing down arm and body mechanics on the changeup.
 
Nov 22, 2019
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Looks like her arm slows down on the changeup. Dead give away to older batters, a ton of girls do this. Just was watching a Beverly Bandits 13U team play 10 minutes ago, and even their pitcher, who was throwing very well, fell into the trap of slowing down arm and body mechanics on the changeup.
Yes, I figure that will take years of work and physical maturity. But trying to project 2-3 years into the future, this is a pitch that looks headed in the right direction.
 
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Apr 20, 2015
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Looks like her arm slows down on the changeup. Dead give away to older batters, a ton of girls do this. Just was watching a Beverly Bandits 13U team play 10 minutes ago, and even their pitcher, who was throwing very well, fell into the trap of slowing down arm and body mechanics on the changeup.
Watch chow 16u for one of the nastiest change ups i have ever seen

Sent from my SM-G960U using Tapatalk
 
Jul 31, 2015
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He was agreeing with your point in your OP eg most people won’t be Cat because they don’t have her ability (although you were talking about throwing hard but it probably still applies to her even though she doesn’t throw 70)

Yep. I was referring to the OPs question about his DDs natural mechanics, not Cat Osterman.

But to answer your question:

Michael Jordan’s height and 45” vertical leap are natural advantages.

Greg Louganis has 77% more fast twitch muscle than the average person.

Michael Phelps has a 6’7” wingspan, the torso of a man 4 inches taller, and the legs of a man 8 inches shorter.

Like these other elite athletes, Cat Osterman has a natural ability that others don’t have. In her case she can spin a softball unlike others. Not sure what to attribute it to (Long fingers? Manual dexterity?). But whatever it is she has more of it than anyone else, ever.
 
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Jul 31, 2015
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I always ask pitchers what make their pitches move. Without exception I always get the same answer. "The spin." They look at me like I have 3 heads when I tell them nope, it's more involved. Then I have them watch the video linked below so they have an understanding of what is happening between their releasing the ball and the plate. So they can understand the physics behind a pitch.

This is a short video the Mythbuster's did about making a pitch curve with the help of a NASA engineer and Roger Clemens. It's a good way to shut up all the doubters. It answers the question about a riseball rising.


I have my own theory as to why hitters see the ball rise.

“the axis of spin disrupts the airflow”

so how isn’t spin the primary factor in making the ball move - ??
 

RADcatcher

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Dec 13, 2019
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Two seamer works on concept of laminar flow. There was a discussion on here about it.
That is still dependant of spin/seam orientation.
While also being dependent of a particular axis/yaw.
Like other pitches are.

Perhaps a more technical yet simple way of asking/answering about what makes pitches move
The answer is
The pitcher with a lot of help from other stuff 😎
Screenshot_20210926-103257_Chrome.jpg
 
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